What is a “birds-eye view” of an eclipse?

Nothing about a solar eclipse is normal: Wherever it can be seen, it’s occurs in that manner and in that location only once every several hundred years. For that reason, it’s been impossible for…

Happy Match Day!!!

Congratulations to all medical students who have matched to the residency program of their choice! In celebration of this day–and, signaling the importance of healthcare to the nation–14…

Neurodivergent traits may have benefitted human foragers

A recent study revealed that traits correlating with attention deficit/hyper-sensitivity disorder (ADHD) may correlate with a better ability to forage in some environments. With an online game…

Remote-controlled surgical robot in space could help expand access on earth

The first-ever surgical robot arrived at the International Space Station this month, where it will practice performing surgery at the direction of a surgeon located 250 miles below in Nebraska. MIRA…

Baby outfitted with AI camera yields insights about language development

In a study at New York University, a baby named Sam wore a headcam in weekly sessions that captured his experience for 18 months. Scientists loaded the 61 hours of sights and sounds into a simple AI…

Donor’s gift will establish tuition-free medical school for all Albert Einstein students

Thanks to a $1 billion donation to Albert Einstein College of Medicine, tuition will be free for all medical students of the school going forward. Notably, the institution is located in the Bronx,…

Rooster viewing ruler

How are toxic chemicals affecting human genitals?

Epidemiological research demonstrates that the endocrine disruptors now so prevalent in our environment—including in much of our food and water supply—are causing significant effects to the human…

Can two males produce a female? A breakthrough with mice proves it possible

The implications could be huge for single-sex parenting, as well as for addressing infertility and disorders such as Down’s syndrome. By taking genes from one male mouse, changing those into female…

Centenarian physician still works in medicine 

Dr Howard Tucker has been named the oldest practicing doctor by the Guinness Book of World Records—and, having recently celebrated his 100th birthday, he credits his longevity in part to his…

Using real blood in red ink, as protest

Thanks to an outdated FDA rule, men who have sex with men can’t donate blood. To raise attention to the issue, activists created the Gay Blood Collection pens, inks, paints, and markers in a deep…

Ancient remains indicate surprisingly early medical sophistication

How far back in human history did the earliest surgeries occur? Until recently, the archaeological community believed that the first complex procedures were performed around 7,000 years ago. But a…

Combat sport physicians: When to stop the fight?

It’s a ringside doctor’s job to ensure that fighters avoid major injury. But in a sport defined by violent physical contact and where knockouts determine winners, is it possible to delineate what’s…

When humans began to digest milk

When did humans become lactose-tolerant? A recent study by British researchers aimed to solve this question by collating archaeological genomic data, then modeling multiple factors. Their hypothesis…

Venturing beyond clinical and research careers

Physician-scientists. Physician-executives. Physician-artists. It’s becoming increasingly common for individuals with medical degrees to branch out in their profession, and this podcast series…

First woman to hold medical director position at IndyCar

Motorsports associations require on-staff physicians to promote safety and to evaluate and treat high-velocity crash injuries, as well as to provide medical care to the drivers, their families, and…

The secret (social?) life of mushrooms

Do mushrooms have intelligence? Recent research into four species of fungi discovered electrical impulses running through their networks under the soil. The researcher suggests that these impulses…

Are birds a public health threat to drivers? What are the stats on plane emergencies? And other questions for Freakonomics

Whether flying creatures help increase the rate of car accidents. Why early detection of cancer may not positively affect survival time. How often medical emergencies occur on flights. This episode…

Pediatrician fights for access to COVID-19 vaccines in Florida

Equity and access challenges in healthcare often occur for geographic reasons, such as lack of proximity to hospitals in rural regions, or lack of resources in underserved neighborhoods. But in the…

How anti-vaccine foes coopted the abortion rallying cry

This article lays out a curious intersection between two hot-button medical issues: Vaccine skeptics have framed vaccination and mask mandates as violations of personal choice, rather than matters…

Scientists suggest keeping your poop in the bank—it could save your life

Can fecal matter be used to treat disease? In a recent study, Harvard researchers posit that stool samples stored from a healthy individual can later be used to rejuvenate the diversity in that…

Doctors moonlighting on tiktok?

Is it appropriate for physicians to actively publish medical information and viewpoints on social media, or does being an “influencer” in the health space pose ethical dilemmas? This article…

Meet the released Ukrainian medic who cared for both Russian and Ukrainian soldiers

Thanks to a body camera chronicling her efforts to save the wounded in Mariupol, medic Yuliia Paievska was able to leave a Russian prison following three months in detention. In this video, she…

Up in arms, up in the air: Sub-par medical kits on planes

A manual blood pressure cuff. Dinky plastic stethoscope. Empty glucometer case. Epinephrine…without an epi-pen. This is what a physician might encounter in the medical kit that he or she is handed…

How Eli Lilly lost its taste for pot and refuses to acknowledge its past

Who knew that the pharmaceutical behemoth behind insulin once grew fields of weed? This podcast episode—amidst the entertaining banter between a physician and her husband—chronicles the history of…

Drunk animals, and the sober hamster

Apparently, the unique physiology of hamsters makes them impervious to inebriation. The rodent can drink what for humans would be the equivalent of 1.5 liters of alcohol to no effect, based on a…

The Language Game: We Are Physicians, Not Providers

How do you feel about the distinction between the term “Physician” and “Provider”? It matters quite a bit to this author, who posits that the latter term fails to acknowledge the time, effort, and…

Eradicating racial bias in residency programs

This article picks up the hot topic of diversity, positing that racial bias in training programs may contribute to a lack of BIPOC physicians in competitive and lucrative specialties. Three black…

People are preserving dead relatives’ tattoos and turning them into art

What are the medical ethics about skinning a cadaver to create framed art? Does it make sense because of how expensive and elaborate people’s tattoos can be? Is it a poignant way to preserve the…

“Word Doc,” a medical-style Wordle spin-off

Unless you’ve been locked in an operating room since the summer of 2021, chances are you know Wordle. Now, there are versions of the daily game created specifically for medical professionals: Check…